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I would like advice on the best way forward with my case.

My older kid (now adult) is totally alienated. While it was developing I wanted my older kid to see a psychologist about it but the ex refused, I took it to Court and the Family Report Writer (FRW) said there was no alienation and recommended against it, so it didn't happen and later the older kid became totally alienated.

Now the FRW is recommending that I be prevented from taking my younger kid to a psychologist if I see alienation developing with my younger kid - no explanation given.
The FRW acknowledges that my relationship with the older kid is destroyed but doesn't comment how, or how to protect the younger kid from the same thing, in fact seems to be recommending the same recipe that allowed the older kid to become alienated.

I think I need an alienation expert to advise the Court (the FRW is a social worker).
What is the best way to do this?
- ask for a second family report (I hear this can be hard to get ordered, and time may be a problem)
- have an expert (who hasn't interviewed anyone) appear as a witness at the trial to answer questions from both sides?
- have an expert look over affidavits and write a report?
- any other ideas?

Thanks
(07-Sep-2018, 10:10 PM)Preption Wrote: [ -> ]My older kid (now adult) is totally alienated. 

Now the FRW is recommending that I be prevented from taking my younger kid to a psychologist if I see alienation developing with my younger kid - no explanation given.

In my experience assisting other parents, I know of a handful of cases only where a psychologist has been able to successfully combat alienation, without recommending that the child be completely removed from the influence of the other parent.

I understand it is perhaps a desperate call for help on your part, but I just don't think the system is skilled and balanced enough to address alienation without drastic action, which often in truth defeats the purpose and causes more damage to the child.

Now, depending on the age and gender of the younger child, a number of factors can be at play, but first you may want to provide some more details.

-What is the gender and age of younger child?
-What is gender of adult child?
-Are both these children full siblings?
-Are both these children in contact with each other, and if so, what is their relationship?
-What in your view is the specific cause of the alienation in both cases?
-And perhaps the hardest question of all...and this is in no way suggesting that you are at fault, but being brutally honest with yourself, can you say what you did (that you could have better controlled in hindsight), that facilitated this alienation in both the children?